Armored Feint, Scenario Design, Part II

Here’s a higher-level US perspective before the enemy votes:
357IR's field order (derived from division) with company taskings and attachments. Note that, in four days time, B company ends up on the bn's right (w).
357IR’s field order (derived from division) with company taskings and attachments. Note that, in four days time, B company ends up on the bn’s right (w).

 

Excerpt from 712th Tank Battalion's S3 log, 7-9 July, 1944
Excerpt from 712th Tank Battalion’s S3 log, 7-9 July, 1944

“Practically no resistance encountered.” Tank battalion journals routinely overstate advances and understate resistance. Infantry ones never understate resistance.

Here’s OKW’s overlay for the sector on 4 July. 357IR is attacking into 77 Infanterie, backed up by 15 FJR:

The X marks the limits of the game map. Note that the Germans refer to Le Plessis as Plessis and not "Beau Coudray."
The X marks the limits of the game map. Note that the Germans refer to Le Plessis as Plessis and not “Beau Coudray.”

2 thoughts on “Armored Feint, Scenario Design, Part II”

  1. I love reading the actual orders, I don’t know why authors don’t put more excerpts in their books.

    2a– 1stBn attacks over 300yds, in BoB terms that works out to 27 squads (plus another 15 tanks, and the Cannon co.) over 7 hexes, right?

    This module is going to be so cool.

    1. Hmm. Yes. That’s an unusually narrow frontage. I wouldn’t wonder if the attack was ordered in columns of companies. Which actually makes sense given the regiment’s experience in June. I’ll have another look at the field manual for a rifle battalion commander, but from memory I believe this is how you would want to attack in closed terrain. Looking at the other battalion’s deployments this seems to be the case.

      This document is interesting as 1 and 3/357 soon become intermingled, in part contributing to the confusion preventing the organization of a stronger attack to rescue I and L companies. As soon as company A came under fire it went to cover and stayed there for about a day. (This is well in front of the terrain depicted on the map.) The Germans (and the terrain) were successful in obliging the companies to attack abreast all along their line. COL Barth soon found himself fighting his companies across a 1500 yard frontage. The losses over the six days were such that a scratch company had to be formed of service and support personnel to fend off counterattacks.

      I’m beginning to think the embarrassment of means enjoyed by the US is an impediment in bocage fighting. Twenty-seven rifle squads, yep. But don’t forget the weapons company! Use them wisely….
      But that’s for the campaign scenarios. A different kettle of fish, design wise.

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